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  • 13 Oct 2016 3:34 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Grandma is currently going through end of life care and I will use this blog to share her story and my experience as a primary caregiver. 

    Here is when it began. We noticed grandma's weight loss from a few months ago, and she started losing more and more weight. We knew something was up, we had a feeling it might be bad, but she didn't want to get it checked. Finally on that day, she told my aunty that her discharge in diapers had been more than normal and she agreed to visit a GP. But even so, she still went for her usual exercises for the day. The GP said she should go to A&E for further checks, we tried not to scare her, so she had some oats first before taking a taxi with Aunt and Mum to the hospital. At the A&E, the usual triage process happens and grandma went thru a whole barrage of checks before finally getting a bed at 2am. From 6pm, she was wheeled into the patient's only area where family was not allowed. Total wait time for 84 year old elderly lady = 9 hours. Doc did give us a quick update at 630pm and it confirmed that she did have a growth and its likely to be end stage cervical cancer and they found  large lump (5cm) and she would have to be warded. It wasn't a big surprise, we kinda knew.  I hope she would get a bed soon and she can undergo the care needed. But the wait continued and we waited outside. It's pretty much a waiting game at A&E. I decided to go bug the staff at 8pm and I managed to give her some dinner. From the caregiver's perspective, I felt at a loss waiting outside in the waiting area cause I was not allowed inside where grandma was kept at, yet I had no information given to me about what was going on with her. It was frustrating and worrying at the same time. I decided to play the sad puppy card and told the security guards about grandma and that i wanted to give her water, could they let me in, which they kindly did. (Grandma is frail so she would have been unable to get her own water or food). Finally at 11pm, I went to bug them again, and thats when they said they would message us on the phone when she got a bed. At this point, grandma had fallen asleep inside already. I understand the healthcare system and the A&E process, but as our population faces a rapidly ageing challenge, I think we need more sensitivity to the needs of the elderly when they are in the A&E. Eg. blankets, water, diaper changes, having the emergency bell available to them instead of hidden away in some corner, access to food if they are expected to wait longer. Healthcare teams focus on treatments, which is great, but sometimes we do need a little more empathy for the elderly patients because their needs are a little different to the average patient. 

  • 09 Sep 2016 9:22 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    I came across this video that features the use of voice technology to engage elderly in Japan in a sumo wrestling match. This really looks interesting, and I see a lot of potential where rehabilitation can be made more fun and interactive for our elderly staying in the facilities.  

    Check out video link here


    Photo credit: https://www.coloribus.com/adsarchive/casestudy/geriatric-health-services-facility-hitorizawa-ton-ton-voice-sumo-video-21387505/

    Keen to learn more? Drop me an email: janicechia@ageingasia.com

  • 09 Sep 2016 9:17 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Having fun cooking up a storm and eating too! Here is a sneak peak at the wonderful delights that our members have been cooking and sharing.


  • 09 Sep 2016 8:55 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)




  • 09 Aug 2016 1:09 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    We had a twin celebration of Norman's Graduation and National Day at ASPIRE55. Norman has just graduated from Nanyang Technological University and we are proud to be part of the celebrations for him. Thank you to all our members who contributed towards being part of our celebrations and especially to our members who displayed such wonderful cooking skills and a sharing spirit. 


     
  • 18 May 2015 1:15 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    ASPIRE55 is about intergenerational aspirational ageing – young and old supporting each other to age in our own homes.  Ageing impacts us at all ages. Whether we are 25, 45, or 65, we all have someone around us that is growing older. I have always looked forward to growing older, having the maturity to process experiences, appreciating life for what it gives us, contentment and having the financial security and luxury of time to do the things that mean the most to me.

    I believe each generation’s outlook towards quality of life and lifestyle is different. Our approach towards filial piety is changing as we head towards a world without borders and smaller family units. In the past, being filial means that you hire someone to look after your parents as they age, and to them, this was a much appreciated gesture and a sign that they are well loved by their children. However, a very wise Professor once told me, if you care too much for someone, you remove their ability to be independent. If you stop letting someone boil water for six months, they will forget how to boil water.

    The current generation of baby boomers (55 – 67 years old) and older adults are a more well educated, widely traveled and  fiercely independent group. They value their freedom, they are financially secure, and are health conscious. They view living with their children as a choice, and many have already chosen not to. Instead, the approach towards filial piety for this group is now transforming to “how we can make them happy”.

    Both “filial piety” and “laughter” is pronounced as “xiao” in mandarin. As our society evolves, so will our attitudes. One important question that we should ask ourselves is what can we do more to age in good health, with dignity and independence so that we can improve the quality of our life as we age. Happiness is more than the material things in life, its about having a sense of purpose and feeling emotionally fulfilled. The ageing population is not a challenge for our society, the bigger problem is social isolation and loneliness.

  • 25 Feb 2015 12:01 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    "Services focused on tracking health will be able to use the Watch interface to display relevant, up-to-the-minute statistics in a way that’s more convenient than on a smartphone, or on a monitoring device’s screen. It will do this using the processing power of your iPhone, rather than a mobile chip onboard the watch itself, and updates will be sent to the watch wirelessly." - http://www.wired.com/2015/02/apple-watch-apps/

  • 05 Jan 2015 8:20 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    80,000 people in SG will have Dementia by 2030. I went to visit De Hogeweyk two months ago in Amsterdam. its a wonderful environment that is very costly to build and operate, but the people living there are happy and the staff are happy and they attract a regular stream of committed volunteers. The benefits come in terms of reduced medications, lower staff turnover, lesser incidences of aggressive behaviors associated with living with Dementia. Whilst the first instincts of a lot of people is that such a facility is too expensive to built and it can't be done, maybe we just need to open our minds a little more, and explore what can be done. Just because we have built health and aged care facilities in a certain way in the last 100 years, doesn't mean we have to continue building them that way in future. We often don't think about such issues until our loved ones are put in that situation. For someone living with Dementia, their reality and ours is different, and what makes they happy is just what De Hogeweyk has achieved. I met with the founders, and for them and all their staff, seeing their loved ones cared for in such an environment brings such relief and comfort. Its a home where they would feel assured to have their loved ones living there. Pic attached was taken with one of the clients who lives there, she volunteers with pushing the lolly trolley every afternoon accompanied with a volunteer. Free lollies, most importantly, smiles all around from fellow neighbours and staff. If happiness was a KPI, perhaps the aged care world would be a little different.

  • 31 Dec 2014 7:58 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    I am often asked why a young person like myself would want to start ASPIRE55? When I first brought up the idea and brainstormed it with fellow co-founder, Yiing Ching (YC), we talked about it with our family members in mind. How would they age, where would they live, what type of activities and services they would need if they were to continue living in their own homes. As such, ASPIRE55 has been and will always be a family oriented village, where we bring our families and friends together, and we welcome new members into the ASPIRE55 family.

    Grandma at 82 years old has always been one of my biggest inspirations for my focus on the ageing sector. When I brought her on a cruise recently, she was walking stronger and more steadily than people over 10 years younger than her. Since a year ago, she has been regularly introduced to different activities and new friends. She works out twice a week and she loves chatting with younger friends. When she goes to the park downstairs, she loves practicing English with our Caucasian neighbors.  Something I have learnt is that simply telling our loved ones to go out, go exercise, go make new friends, go take up a new course, does not work. If you care about your them, take the time to accompany them through the first step. Many of our members first visit to our club is accompanied by their friends or family members. Sometimes, all they need is just a little encouragement and support from us when we are trying to get them to try something new.

Founder's Blog: Janice Chia 
  • I am often asked why a young person like myself would want to start ASPIRE55? When I first brought up the idea and brainstormed it with fellow co-founder, Yiing Ching (YC), we talked about it with our family members in mind. How would they age, where would they live, what type of activities and services they would need if they were to continue living in their own homes. As such, ASPIRE55 has been and will always be a family oriented village, where we bring our families and friends together, and we welcome new members into the ASPIRE55 family.
    Grandma, then at 80 years old has always been one of my biggest inspirations for my focus on the ageing sector. When I brought her on a cruise recently, she was walking stronger and more steadily than people over 10 years younger than her. Since a year ago, she has been regularly introduced to different activities and new friends. She works out twice a week and she loves chatting with younger friends. When she goes to the park downstairs, she loves practicing English with our Caucasian neighbors.  Something I have learnt is that simply telling our loved ones to go out, go exercise, go make new friends, go take up a new course, does not work. If you care about your them, take the time to accompany them through the first step. Many of our members first visit to our club is accompanied by their friends or family members. Sometimes, all they need is just a little encouragement and support from us when we are trying to get them to try something new.
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